Nursing May Help Babies' Oral Health

There’s more good news for the approximately 80 percent of babies who are breastfed in America each year. According to a new study out of Queensland, Australia, nursing a baby can help improve oral health from birth.

Conducted at the Queensland University of Technology, the study was published in the medical journal Scientific Reports and examined the effects of saliva and breast milk on babies’ oral biomes. Researchers found that the combination of the two helped stave off some dangerous microbes for up to 24 hours.

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Traveling for Work? Don’t Skip the Oral Health Routine

b2ap3_thumbnail_shutterstock_263484728.jpgWhether you’re a first-time parent or a seasoned pro, it’s impossible to know everything there is to know about raising babies. This is especially true when it comes to caring for your baby’s teeth. Perhaps that’s why nearly 35 percent of children don’t see their family dentist for the first time until after their second birthday, more than a full year after the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry's (AAPD) recommendation of age 1.

But even the most diligent parent can still have questions about their children’s teeth and still may not know when their children should meet certain oral health milestones. One particular milestone that many parents may miss, or may not realize the importance of, is the discontinuation of the baby bottle. Though it may not seem dental-related, extended use of baby bottles can be harmful past the age of 1. Dr. Martin Abelar of San Diego, California, explains why.

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